How do I organise a screening? Kingston University case study.

“…it’s really simple and easy to do but not everyone would have done it. And it’s going to change a lot. It’s a biggest pride to an individual to be able to ‘change the world’, especially students, when the future remains uncertain and when you are fighting to be recognized as an individual.

On Friday 26th November, Transmission 6-10 was screened to over 30 people at Kingston University. We wanted to share our experiences to inspire and help you organise your own.

“I felt Transmission 6-10 deserved to be shown in a cinema setting, and to a wider audience. It raises such important issues, all from first hand sources and interviewees.” Jane Werrell, co-organiser.

HOW DID YOU GET STARTED?

The first step Jane took in organising the screening was to contact us. With our full support, Jane proposed the idea to Elina Street, who runs the Cinema Appreciation Society ay Kingston Uni.

“I was very interested at first when I heard about the wide range of subject matters this film related to. I am still speechless when I come to realize that most of these things, most of us actually ignore! It is with films like this that we come to realize the truth, and this is crucial to our world today. We need to be told, and apparently if it weren’t through films like this, how else? and ‘who’ else? I was also very interested in screening this, as I think film is one of the best communicative media methods in our world today for these types of matters and subjects . The screening made it more accessible as well because sometimes, when something is diffused only via internet, you can easily be distracted or driven to another website. The screening is a direct straight forward demonstration technique- truly effective I think.” Elina Street, co-organiser.

WHO DID YOU PROMOTE IT TO?

Jane used the Freshers Fayre to search other student societies that existed at Kingston Uni, and whose members might be interested in the screening. We created a draft email that we would use to contact everyone. We also composed a personalised paragraph for the email, specific to the interest of each society. Jane and Elina began emailing people most likely to attend, such as film students, as well as those studying human rights or international affairs. The United Nations Association Kingston University were holding a human rights film festival on the same week, so happily promoted the screening for us. Jane and Elina also contacted members of different faith societies, both directly and through the University chaplain, who was also more than happy to help. From there, our time permitted us to email other students, such as those interested in business, investment, Law and Marxism. We wanted to reach as many people as possible.

WHERE DID YOU HOLD THE SCREENING?

The Cinema Appreciation Society uses Robert’s  lecture theatre at the uni on a weekly basis to screen films, so this was a natural and perfect choice of venue. The seating was tiered for the audience. There was a large cinema-style screen with speaker systems, run through a computer station built into a lecture podium. This was also linked into the internet, allowing the Q&A session to include discussion about the website and outreach. The film was played using a DVD. ORDER A DVD

HOW DID YOU PROMOTE IT?

Once the venue and times were confirmed, Elina used Adobe Photoshop to modify the screening poster to include those details. She printed her posters, as well as smaller versions to use as flyers, using the funding resources from the Cinema Appreciation Society. An alternative could have been to download and print a poster, hand-write the screening details, and then colour photocopy. Jane and Elina put posters and flyers in all three campuses at Kingston University, with Elina leaving flyers in halls of residence, as well as handing some out by hand..

Kingston University also has TV screens to disseminate information to students. Jane contacted the Student Union to ask if we could promote the event on these TV’s. They agreed, so Ben Trennery, who has designed the website and branding of Transmission 6-10, produced an image for us to use.

The Transmission 6-10 Facebook page was re-developed to be able to host details of the screening event, and to link directly to the Cinema Appreciation Society Facebook page. Elina used this page to promote the screening, and sent out messages to members about the event..

We also had the iPhone trailer and teaser to download and use for promotion (right click and ‘Save Link As…’)

THE SCREENING

Upon hearing that the screening was taking place, a local woman who practices Falun Gong baked prawn crackers, and travelled into London China Town to buy food for the audience. Elina and her friends also brought snacks and drinks, which were laid out along the front, together with a kettle for green tea.

After a brief introduction by Andy Moody, one of Transmission 6-10’s two Directors, the film was screened, and followed by a Q&A session with the audience.

Jane’s mum attended the screening. She works as a journalist for a Japanese newspaper, so wrote an article about the event, helping promote the film to her readers. (Click here to read article)

There were some regular members but most of the people came because they were really interested in the subject matter of the film. I think it is important as well to notice that we had people coming from all over the world at the screening, very international. The responses were positive, through the lively debate. This was definitely a plus, as this is such a polemic matter. This continued as well the week after. I spoke to a couple of the members, and they were very enthusiastic. This definitely changed their awareness.

Also many were simply feeling grateful and fortunate to have the honour of taking the responsibility of having to ‘change the world’. Like you said, it’s through communicating and showing the film, as well as sending off the website, that things can change; it’s really simple and easy to do but not everyone would have done it. And it’s going to change a lot. It’s a biggest pride to an individual to be able to ‘change the world’, especially students, when the future remains uncertain and when you are fighting to be recognized as an individual.” Elina Street.

[KUSU LOGO] On Friday 26th November, Transmission 6-10 was screened to over 30 people at Kingston University. We wanted to share our experiences to inspire and help you organise your own.

I felt Transmission 6-10 deserved to be shown in a cinema setting, and to a wider audience. It raises such important issues, all from first hand sources and interviewees.” Jane Werrell, co-organiser.

HOW DO YOU GET STARTED?

The first step Jane took in organising the screening was to get in contact with us. With our full support, Jane proposed the idea to Elina Street, organiser of the Cinema Appreciation Society during Freshers Fair. Elina agreed, and the organising began.

I was very interested at first when I heard about the wide range of subject matters this film related too. I am still speechless when I come to realize that most of these things, most of us actually ignore! It is with films like this that we come to realize the truth, and this is crucial to our world today. We need to be told, and apparently if it weren’t through films like this, how else? and ‘who’ else? I was also very interested in screening this, as I think film is one of the best communicative media methods in our world today for these types of matters and subjects . The screening made it more accessible as well because sometimes, when something is diffused only via internet, you can easily be distracted or driven to another website. The screening is a direct straight forward demonstration technique- truly effective I think.” Elina Street, co-organiser.

WHO DID YOU PROMOTE IT TO?

Jane used the Freshers Fair to search other student societies that existed at Kingston University, and whose members might be interested in the screening. We created a draft email that we would use to contact everyone. We also composed a personalised paragraph of the email specific to the interest of each society, referring to the societies catalogue. Jane and Elina began emailing people most likely to attend, such as film students, as well as those studying human rights or international affairs. There was a human rights film festival being held the same week in the University, who happily promoted the screening for us. Jane and Elina also contacted members of different faith societies, both directly and through the University chaplain, who was more than happy to help. From there, our time permitted us to email other people. We wanted to reach as many people as possible.

WHERE DID YOU HOLD THE SCREENING?

The Cinema Appreciation Society uses a particular lecture theatre on a weekly basis to screen films, so this was a natural and perfect choice of venue. The seating was tiered for the audience. There was a large cinema-style screen with speaker systems, run through a computer station built into a lecture podium. This was also linked into the internet, allowing the Q&A session to include discussion about the website and outreach. The film was played using a DVD. ORDER A DVD

The basic elements of a screening are a DVD (or download version) and something to view it on. Everything else depends on your circumstances, and size of audience. Perhaps its a few friends huddled around a computer, or as in this case, a lecture room of people.

HOW DO I PROMOTE IT?

[POSTER] Once the venue details and times were confirmed, Elina used Adobe Photoshop to modify the screening poster to include details of their screening. She printed her posters, and smaller versions to use as flyers, using the funding resources from the Cinema Appreciation Society. An alternative could have been to download and print a poster, hand-write the screening details, and then copy this. Jane and Elina put posters and flyers in all three campuses at Kingston University, with Elina leaving flyers in halls of residence, as well as handing some out by hand.

[TV SCREEN] Kingston University also has TV screens to disseminate information to students. Jane contacted the Student Union to ask if we could promote the screening on these TVs. They agreed, so Ben Trennery, who has designed the website and branding of Transmission 6-10, produced an image to use.

The Transmission 6-10 Facebook page was developed to be able to host details of the screening event, and to link directly to the Cinema Appreciation Society Facebook page. Elina used her page to promote the screening, and sent out messages to members about the event.

We also had the iPhone trailer and teaser to download and use to promote the film.

THE SCREENING

Upon hearing that the screening was taking place, a local woman who practices Falun Gong baked prawn crackers, and travelled into London China Town to buy food, so that the audience would have refreshments. Elina and members of the audience also brought snacks and drinks, which were laid out along the front, together with a kettle for green tea.

After a brief introduction by Andy Moody, one of Transmission 6-10’s two Directors, the film was screened, and followed by a Q& A session with the audience.

Jane’s mum attended the screening. She works as a journalist for a Japanese newspaper, so wrote an article about the event, helping promote the film to her readers.

There were some regular members but most of the people came because they were really interested in the subject matter of the film. I think it is important as well to notice that we had people coming from all over the world at the screening, very international. The responses were positive, through the lively debate. This was definitely a plus, as this is such a polemic matter. This continued as well the week after. I spoke to a couple of the members, and they were very enthusiastic. This definitely changed their awareness.

Also many were simply feeling grateful and fortunate to have the honour of taking the responsibility of having to ‘change the world’. Like you said, it’s through communicating and showing the film, as well as sending off the website, that things can change; it’s really simple and easy to do but not everyone would have done it. And it’s going to change a lot. It’s a biggest pride to an individual to be able to ‘change the world’, especially students, when the future remains uncertain and when you are fighting to be recognized as an individual.” Elina Street.